Product Details
978-0-7798-6676-2
Book
Approximately 180 pages
1 volume bound
softcover
2015-06-30
Carswell

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Researching Quebec Law: Insights for Common Law Practitioners
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$71.00
Description

This practical guide is written for non-French-speaking lawyers, librarians, students and other legal researchers, who require an understanding of the key similarities and differences of the Quebec legal system and its resources.

Researching Quebec Law is a practical guide for non-French-speaking lawyers, librarians, students and other legal researchers from common law jurisdictions who require an understanding of the key similarities and differences of the Quebec legal system and its resources. The legal system in Quebec is marked by a unique co-existence of the civil law and common law traditions, making it a "mixed jurisdiction." While the ever-expanding scope of online legal databases has made Quebec case law and legislation accessible to common law researchers and practitioners like never before, very few of Quebec's leading legal treatises are available or have been translated into English. This book consists of two parts. The first part is an introduction to Quebec law generally, and Quebec civil law specifically. It provides an overview of the sources of law used to research substantive law in Quebec: legislation, jurisprudence and doctrine (commentary). The second part provides bibliographic and analytical overviews of substantive law topics that frequently puzzle common law researchers.
About the Author
Clare Mauro is a Senior Librarian at the Toronto office of Torys LLP, where she has provided advanced legal research services and instruction to lawyers and law students for more than ten years. Clare has been a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada since 2000, and is a graduate of the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto (M.I.st.) and the Faculty of Law at McGill University (LL.B.). She taught the course "Legal Research on the Web" at the iSchool Institute at the University of Toronto and has been a sessional instructor at the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario.