Product details

Publisher: 
Carswell
Practice area: 
Immigration
Jurisdiction: 
Canada
Publication date: 
2022-05-09
ISBN: 
9780779899029
Carswell

Citizenship Law in Canada: Acquisition and Loss of Citizenship and Citizens’ Rights and Obligations, Softbound book

Availability: Partial Stock

In recent years, the law surrounding the granting, resumption, and loss of Canadian Citizenship, and the rights and responsibilities of Canadian Citizens, has undergone significant change and have been controversial. As a result, there have been some high profile legislative changes to the federal Citizenship Act, which included the following:

  • Bill C-14 in 2007, which allowed children adopted abroad to acquired citizenship by direct grant.
  • Bill C-37 in 2009, which enabled many categories of “lost Canadians” to acquire or reacquire Canadian citizenship retroactively and limit the transfer of citizenship.
  • Bill C-24 in 2014, which amended key provisions including setting the requirements to acquire citizenship, the process to examine applications for citizenship and the grounds and procedure to revoke citizenship.
  • Bill C-6 in 2017, which amended provisions regarding the requirements to obtain citizenship and the procedure and grounds for revocation.

Citizenship Law in Canada: Acquisition and Loss of Citizenship and Citizens’ Rights and Obligations is a comprehensive book about citizenship law in Canada. It is arranged in three lengthy chapters: Chapter 1 delves into the web of provisions that have accumulated over time, and that, together describe the various means by which someone can acquire citizenship in Canada. Chapter 2 addresses how a citizen can lose citizenship, either voluntarily or otherwise. Finally, Chapter 3 broadens the study well beyond the Citizenship Act, to look at the rights and obligations that are attached to the status of being a Canadian Citizen. In this last chapter, readers will recognize some issues and stories that have received wide coverage in the media in recent years, and in some cases are still ongoing. In each of these chapters, the authors highlight and critically analyze key judicial decisions that have had a profound influence in shaping what it means to be a “Canadian Citizen.

Carswell

Citizenship Law in Canada: Acquisition and Loss of Citizenship and Citizens’ Rights and Obligations, Softbound book

Availability: Partial Stock

Description

In recent years, the law surrounding the granting, resumption, and loss of Canadian Citizenship, and the rights and responsibilities of Canadian Citizens, has undergone significant change and have been controversial. As a result, there have been some high profile legislative changes to the federal Citizenship Act, which included the following:

  • Bill C-14 in 2007, which allowed children adopted abroad to acquired citizenship by direct grant.
  • Bill C-37 in 2009, which enabled many categories of “lost Canadians” to acquire or reacquire Canadian citizenship retroactively and limit the transfer of citizenship.
  • Bill C-24 in 2014, which amended key provisions including setting the requirements to acquire citizenship, the process to examine applications for citizenship and the grounds and procedure to revoke citizenship.
  • Bill C-6 in 2017, which amended provisions regarding the requirements to obtain citizenship and the procedure and grounds for revocation.

Citizenship Law in Canada: Acquisition and Loss of Citizenship and Citizens’ Rights and Obligations is a comprehensive book about citizenship law in Canada. It is arranged in three lengthy chapters: Chapter 1 delves into the web of provisions that have accumulated over time, and that, together describe the various means by which someone can acquire citizenship in Canada. Chapter 2 addresses how a citizen can lose citizenship, either voluntarily or otherwise. Finally, Chapter 3 broadens the study well beyond the Citizenship Act, to look at the rights and obligations that are attached to the status of being a Canadian Citizen. In this last chapter, readers will recognize some issues and stories that have received wide coverage in the media in recent years, and in some cases are still ongoing. In each of these chapters, the authors highlight and critically analyze key judicial decisions that have had a profound influence in shaping what it means to be a “Canadian Citizen.